Lab-grown meat might not be the answer to our protein problem

Lab-grown meat might not be the answer to our protein problem

About 14.5 percent of our ­greenhouse-gas emissions come from livestock. But what if you could eat a burger without having a cow?

When Mark Post grew the first lab-made beef in 2013, the patty (“close to meat but not that juicy,” according to one taste tester) cost $330,000. The speculative price of a frankenburger is now a much more palatable $12, and some startups say mock meat will hit shelves within a couple of years.

Plants will most likely always be the greenest protein, but cultured meat could at least become more sustainable than flesh grown on the bone. Here’s how some ­estimates say it will shake out in land and water use, electricity, and emissions.

This article was originally published in the Summer 2018 issue of Popular Science. Read more at PopSci.com.

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