If you want personalized medicine, we’ll need to know what time it is in your liver

If you want personalized medicine, we’ll need to know what time it is in your liver

Back in 1960, researchers discovered that a specific toxin, given to a mouse at one time of the day, would kill it. Administer the same poison at a different time, and the mouse was fine.

The study of mammals’ circadian rhythms has come a long way since then, but in humans, circadian medicine is still in its infancy. However, understanding how our bodies rhythms influence our receptivity to chemicals could have big effects. Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center have created a “human circadian atlas” with information about how our circadian rhythms affect different parts of the body. They hope it will help make the idea of personalized medicine built around the body clock more mainstream, and improve patient outcomes.

Read more at PopSci.com.

A blindfolded sea otter named Selka shows how the critters find food in murky water

A blindfolded sea otter named Selka shows how the critters find food in murky water

This new blood test can figure out what time it is inside your cells

This new blood test can figure out what time it is inside your cells